Should NDNU Athletes be paid?

In college sports, the argument that athletes should be paid has been going on for over a decade. The argument has really picked up steam over the past couple of years. Many now feel that a portion of the money being brought in by the sports programs to enhance universities and coaches salaries should go to the ones who earn it on the field or court.

Notre Dame de Namur University has 11 sports teams, the scholarships per team at the division II collegiate level are no where near the same amount as the division I level. The National Collegiate Athletic Association II scholarships regulations for men’s and women’s sports are listed below.

Men’s Sports Scholarships Available at Division 2 Level


Basketball 10 Scholarships

Cross Country 12.6 Scholarships

Golf 3.6 Scholarships

Lacrosse 10.8 Scholarships

Soccer 9 Scholarships

Women’s Sports Scholarships Available at Division 2 Level

Basketball 10 Scholarships

Cross Country 5 Scholarships

Soccer 9.9 Scholarships

Softball 7.2 Scholarships

Tennis 6 Scholarships

There are a ton of arguments for collegiate athletes being paid a salary. College sports is a billion dollar industry. According to CollegeSportsScholarships.com, the coaches, Athletic Directors and universities are making millions off of their respective athletic teams. CollegeSportsScholarships.com also pointed out that collegiate athletes spend an average of 30-40 hours per week participating in their respective practices, games and team meetings. On a typical day, the athletes will wake up before 6 a.m. for weight lifting and conditioning, go to class from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., and then head to practice until 6 p.m. After practice, many teams have meetings, study hall and other mandatory team requirements. This schedule is usually six days a week, with colleges only required to give the athletes one day off per week. The athletes also have to balance a full schedule of classes and many also work a job. The number of hours the athletes are participating in their sports is a close equivalent to a full time job.

In return, the college athletes are given a scholarship for their education. This scholarship can be as little or as much as the university believes the athlete is worth. Most athletes are rewarded a scholarship that covers roughly 25-100 percent of the entire tuition. The biggest myth about scholarships is that they are all cover 100 percent of books, food, dorms, and tuition. This is almost never the case. As the break down of scholarships at the division 2 level per sport states above, most teams do not have anywhere near enough scholarships to give out one full scholarship to each player. Another myth behind scholarships is that once you are given one by a university, that is it valid for all four years. Scholarships are given on a year to year basis and are based on the players past seasons performance. This business model can put a ton of stress on the athletes, who have little to no security. It is a business model that allows its employees, the athletes, to make a minuscule fraction of what the universities earn. It is extremely tough for a college athlete to have piece of mind in regard to the next year. If an athlete is inured, he or she could easily loose their scholarship and education.

Most NDNU athletes do not feel they should be paid a salary outside for their efforts, but definitely feel their needs to be some changes around campus. After sitting down with a volleyball play and a basketball player, the issues on campus were made clear. An anonymous volleyball player said the following,

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Women’s Basketball player #7 determined to give it her all. Image provided by Jordan Ross

“I don’t think we should get paid. We’re just like everyone else.If there was going to be any compensation for the time we put in for the school, it should be to able to park by the gym or for the caf to actually stay open and serve us dinner when our practices run late. We’ve gotten denied food so many times when we’re only a couple minutes late.”

The dining hall being closed at inopportune times seems to be the root of every NDNU athletes angst. A NDNU basketball player echoed the volleyball team’s point of view.

“We can’t control our practice schedule and it sucks when we work so hard and have to go off campus and buy food instead of eating the food we already paid for in our tuition.”

It is clear that changes need to be made in order to give our athletes some improvements in basic accommodations on campus. We need to be able to give the athletes a fraction of what they bring back to this University.

The Real MVP’s

Any sports fan loves to see their favorite team push themselves to get the win. Usually people focus on their favorite player and how that player trains to be great- though many people do not take the time to think who else helped push this athlete to become the greater player he or she is today. People always remember the coaching staff, but what about the Athletic Training staff? They have to work just as hard and as many hours as the athletes themselves.

Being an athletic trainer is both a difficult and joyful career, but also very unique in its own way. An athletic trainer is a care professional that specializes in preventing, recognizing, managing and rehabilitating injuries. In cooperation with physicians, other health personal, coaches and parents, the athletic trainer functions as an integral member of the health care team in clinics, schools, universities, professional sports programs, and other various athletic health care settings.

Not only do athletic trainers have to push themselves to learn everything about injuries and injury prevention but also how to build a connection with their student athletes in order to push them to be the best.

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“I feel like in this job you come across athletes at one of the worst time in their athletic career-most times due to an injury. When injured they cant participate in the sport that they love. As Athletic Trainers we come into their lives to help them see that they can physically and mentally return to their sport. There is noting more rewarding than to make that investment into their health and well-being, and then see them return to their athletic field, and know you had a part in their success” , shared Corinne Schneider, one of the two athletic trainers here at Notre Dame de Namur University.

Perhaps always remember that athletic trainers at universities are one of the best assets to a college. Not only are they like parents away from home by caring for your injuries, but you begin to develop a bond with your athletic training staff.

“During my time at NDNU Corinne and Christian have not only been there to help me with my injuries but they also take the extra time to help pick me back up on a mental level to help push me to become a better student athlete”, informed NDNU sophomore Lacrosse player Andrew Arabejo.

Numerous student athletes appreciate the time that athletic trainers spend with their student athletes, seeing as they are always there to help them mentally and physically.

“The patience that the athletic trainers have for all the teams here at NDNU and I is very admirable seeing as there is only two of them on staff and over 175 athletes on campus..” NDNU senior Women’s Soccer player Maria Schneider said.

Athletic trainers are the underrated MVP’s in every sport. Take the time to change this. Give them the credit that they deserve!

The naughty boys takeover

Notre Dame de Namur’s very own lacrosse team has come together to keep a tradition they have alive and get some school spirit flowing. They are helping their fellow Argonauts succeed by coming out to home games and cheering -in a rather unique way.

What’s unique about their tactic to increase the school spirit around campus is in the details of the charismatic group itself.. and maybe in the uniforms as well!

Commonly referred to as “The Naughty Boys”, the lacrosse team members have created their own type of spirit squad that scream cheers, dance, and get the crowd laughing and excited to be there! They are the talk of the game as they position themselves in front of the fans and go crazy. But their actions aren’t the only reason why they stand out from the crowd so much!

The spirited squad has an interesting “uniform” that maybe shouldn’t be called a uniform since little clothing is involved. The Lacrosse players stick out by coming to the games in short shorts, no shirt, and bring props to play with. They use their bodies as canvases; oiling up, writing names, numbers, and chants in blue and yellow body paint. At the soccer games the team jams out by using five-gallon buckets as drums to go with their cheers.

When Freshman Lacrosse player Alec Killian was asked the reason as to why the team started the wacky trend this year, Alec responded with, “We wanted to show support for our teams and show some school spirit.”

As a freshman he feels like NDNU could definitely use a little more school spirit and fun on campus. As their pre-game warm up, the team runs a lap around the campus and through the dorms in their skimpy “outfits,” advertising that there is a home game. Killian claims that since the team started showing up to the games, there seems to be more students in the stands.

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Known as “The Naughty Boys”, the 2014 to 2015 Lacrosse team is pictured prior to going out to the Volleyball game. Image provided by: Adrian Hollifield 

 

“We want to get the crowd rowdy and make the games fun to be at for everyone” urges Killian.

Lack of school spirit is something that NDNU students have expressed grief about. Having a special cheer group that is exciting, fun, and down right funny to watch gives students more of a reason to come out to the games.

Andrew Arabejo, a sophomore Lacrosse player, proposed an idea that would help NDNU come together even more.

“It would be a cool idea to create a students only section in one corner of the bleachers. We could call it ‘The Argo Corner’ or something,” suggests Arabejo. “Maybe the Lacrosse team could stand in front of the section and lead cheers.”

NDNU senior Volleyball player Jackie Harper speaks to the spirit. She likes when the LAX team comes to support because they make the games fun. As a player she has noticed that traffic at games has increased and says she wants to return the favor and support them in the Spring.

When asked if she thinks that the Women’s Volleyball team would dress up or create their own cheer squad, “Maybe we’ll dress up, but we’ll stay clothed”, chuckling as she replied.

This year Lacrosse wants to show their group support at as many sporting events as they can this year. They have attended Women’s Volleyball, Men’s and Women’s Soccer games and have special plans to add Men and Women’s Basketball to the mix as well. They hope to turn this trend among the Lacrosse players into a tradition that can be passed on year after year and continue to help the school keep working towards increasing school spirit.

Go Argos!

 

 

Sonoma storms in with Hawaii Pacific University

This past week the Notre Dame de Namur Argonauts played two games one Sept. 21 against Cal State Sonoma State University and the other Sept. 27 against Hawaii Pacific University.

In their first game at Koret Field against CSSSU the Argos played an aggressive, uptempo game. Both offenses were aggressive in the first half forcing senior goal keeper Jay Tsuruoka to make save after save. It was the Argos who struck first when senior Hunter Le Blanc nailed a corner kick that curved right passed the goalie into the back of the net. Later in the first half the Argos earned a free kick.

Le Blanc stepped forward again and sent a pass into the box where sophomore defender Robert Hines III was able to put it in for his first career goal.

When asked about the goal, “I’m happy Hunter (Le Blanc) was able to find me and fortunately the ball went”, Hines said.

The Argos lead 2-0 going into the second half, but in the 55th minute CSSSU was able to score. For the rest of the half the Argos defense was able to shut down the opponent. In the closing seconds of the game junior defender Tyler Matas chased a ball down and kicked in the third goal to give the Argos the win 3-1.

Sept. 27 the Argos played their first conference game against a challenging team, Hawaii Pacific University. HPU got off to an early start scoring two goals but the Argos were able to bounce back scoring two themselves tying the game. But late in the second half HPU was able to squeak one more goal in before time ran out. The Argos lost a tough game 2-3.

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Tyler Matas from the Argomen. Image provided by: Professor Rossi

The Argos are now 2-4-1 overall and 0-1-0 in conference. Their next games are against Hawaii Hilo Sept. 29 at 2 pm and Fresno Pacific Oct. 4 12pm both at Notre Dame de Namur.

Kick-starting the season

This past week the Notre Dame de Namur Argonauts played two games one Sept. 21 against Cal State Sonoma State University and the other Sept. 27 against Hawaii Pacific University.

In their first game at Koret Field against CSSSU the Argos played an aggressive, uptempo game. Both offenses were aggressive in the first half forcing senior goal keeper Jay Tsuruoka to make save after save. It was the Argos who struck first when senior Hunter Le Blanc nailed a corner kick that curved right passed the goalie into the back of the net. Later in the first half the Argos earned a free kick. Le Blanc stepped forward again and sent a pass into the box where sophomore defender Robert Hines III was able to put it in for his first career goal. When asked about the goal Hines said, “I’m happy Hunter (Le Blanc) was able to find me and fortunately the ball went.” The Argos lead 2-0 going into the second half, but in the 55th minute CSSSU was able to score. For the rest of the half the Argos defense was able to shut down the opponent. In the closing seconds of the game junior defender Tyler Matas chased a ball down and kicked in the third goal to give the Argos the win 3-1.

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Photograph provided by Professor Rossi.

Rough Trip to Washington

The NDNU men’s soccer team went up to Washington this past weekend, Saturday September 13th through Monday September 15th, where they played Seattle Pacific University and Western Washington University. It was a tough trip for the Argos losing both games, despite playing extremely well.

The Argos played Seattle Pacific in their first game. It was a long battle throughout with two goals coming from SPU one late in the first half and then another late in the second half.

Next was Western Washington, another rough game. The first half was a defensive battle, then luck struck for the Argos but unfortunately they couldn’t capitalize on a penalty kick. After that, the momentum was all for Western Washington who ended up with a late second half goal. The final score was 1-0.

The Argos are now 1-3 with their next game on Saturday September 20th against San Francisco State University.

 

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Danny Miller from WWU with control over the ball.

Troubles in Washington

The NDNU women’s soccer team took their 2-0 record up to Washington where they played Seattle Pacific University on Saturday September 13th, followed by Western Washington University on Monday September 15th. The girls battled hard through both games but were unable to come away with a victory in either game.

The first game against SPU had a few costly errors of which eventually jeopardized the game. The Lady Argos ended up losing 5-0.

NDNU looked to bounce back against WWU, of which are rated third in the latest National Soccer Coaches Association of America NCAA Division II Top 25. The Lady Argos started off strong holding the Vikings scoreless in the first half. But early in the second WWU was able to find the net and then again later in the half. The final score was 2-0.

The Lady Argos are now 2-2 with their next game Friday, September 19th at 3:30 against San Francisco State.

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A Lady Argo going in for the header against WWU.